Poiset and Associates Pediatric Dental Group, A Professional Corporation

Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics

Mitchell Poiset DDS • Tracy Hagan DMD

Shay Brannan DDS • Jodi McGrady DMD

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What’s an intraoral camera?

October 16th, 2014

One of the greatest features our team at Poiset and Associates Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics offers is the ability to see first-hand how we can help our patients. While X-rays help us detect any problems in your mouth and give us valuable information on what is bothering you, they often don’t give Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady a complete view of everything that is going on inside your mouth. With the use of an intraoral camera, we can see every aspect of your teeth and mouth with incredible detail, uncovering cracked or fractured teeth, excessive wear, carious lesions, cavities, or other issues that may be hidden. When we can discover oral problems early on, your treatment is much less invasive and often saves you money down the road.

An intraoral camera allows Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady to view clear, precise images of your mouth, teeth, and gums and allows us to make an accurate diagnosis.  With clear, defined, enlarged images, Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady and our team see details that standard mirror examinations may miss. It’s much easier to understand what is happening in your mouth if you can see the problem on a computer monitor, and it means faster diagnosis and less chair-time for our patients!

Intraoral cameras are small, about the size of a dental mirror, and emit a light onto the tooth. The tooth will emit a color that lets Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady determine if the tooth is healthy or diseased. Intraoral cameras also allow us to save your images on our office computer to provide a permanent record of treatments. These treatments can be printed for you, other specialists, and your lab or insurance companies.

For any questions about the intraoral camera, we encourage you to ask Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady or our team during your or your child’s next visit or by giving us a call at our convenient San Diego, CA office.

When do children usually lose their baby teeth?

October 9th, 2014

Many parents worry that their children’s teeth are not falling out on time. A lot of concerned parents want to know: When will my child lose his or her first baby tooth? At what age should the last tooth fall out? Is there a specific order in which the teeth are lost?

Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady and our team explain that a child's 20 baby teeth (primary teeth) typically come in by age three and begin to loosen and fall out on their own to make room for permanent teeth, which usually appear by the time your child is six. It is important to know that timing may vary, and girls typically lose their baby teeth earlier than boys. The last baby teeth will likely fall out by the time your child is 13.

So, which teeth do children lose first? Baby teeth tend to fall out in the order in which they came, which means the lower center incisors are usually the first to go when your child is between six and seven years old. The next teeth your child will lose are his or her top center pair, also called the upper central incisors.

It’s important to note that if a child loses a baby tooth early as a result of decay or an unforeseen accident, his or her permanent tooth may erupt early and potentially come in crooked due to limited space. If your child suffers an injury or has tooth decay, we encourage you to give us a call to set up an appointment with Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady.

While we know some children couldn’t be more excited to lose their baby teeth, we know others are anxious about this childhood milestone. When your child starts to lose teeth, our team at Poiset and Associates Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics encourages you to stress the importance of proper dental care on a daily basis.

Remember to:

  • Remind your child to brush his or her teeth at least twice a day. Supervise and offer assistance as needed.
  • Help your child floss his or her teeth at bedtime.
  • Limit eating and drinking between meals and at bedtime, especially sugary treats and drinks, such as candy and soda.
  • Schedule regular dental visits for your child every six months.
  • Ask about the use of fluoride treatments and dental sealants to help prevent tooth decay.

To learn more about baby teeth, or to schedule your child's next visit with Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady at our San Diego, CA office, please give us a call today!

Year-End Insurance Reminder

October 2nd, 2014

Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady, as well as our team at Poiset and Associates Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics, would like to give those patients with flex spend, health savings, or insurance benefits a friendly end of the year reminder that it’s high time to schedule your dental visits so you optimize your benefit.

Now is the time to reserve your appointment with us. Space is limited and we tend to get busy around the holidays, so don’t wait to give us a call at our convenient San Diego, CA office!

Why Baby Teeth Matter

September 25th, 2014

The primary teeth are the initial teeth that erupt from a child’s gums in the first few years of childhood. There are a total of 20 primary teeth, most of which will have appeared no later than age three. Because they are only temporary, some parents believe they are less important than the permanent teeth that will emerge around age five or six. However, primary teeth hold a special significance and are important for a child’s long-term oral health.

Function and importance of baby teeth

Baby teeth have several basic functions. Decay can interfere with these functions, and potentially lead to life-long complications. For example, severe tooth decay that causes tooth loss during childhood, perhaps due to sleeping with a bottle at night, can obstruct a child’s speech development. It can also hinder his or her ability to sufficiently chew food.

The primary teeth also serve as place-holders for the permanent teeth. When a primary tooth falls out or must be removed before its time, surrounding teeth may shift into the space the tooth once held. This can cause orthodontic complications once the permanent teeth begin to erupt, which can lead to serious tooth alignment problems and call for extensive orthodontic treatment.

Caring for baby teeth

Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady and our team at Poiset and Associates Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics will tell you it is never too early to begin caring for your child’s teeth. Baby teeth require the same care and attention that permanent teeth do. The American Dental Association recommends that children see a dentist as soon as the teeth begin to erupt from the gums. Early childhood dental visits usually include examinations, cleanings, fluoride treatments, and hygiene education for parents. It is also important to adopt an oral care routine at home that includes daily brushing, flossing, and dietary modifications that support a lifetime of good oral health.

To learn more about baby teeh, or to schedule an appointment with Drs. Mitchell Poiset, Tracy Hagan, Shay Brannan, and Jodi McGrady for your little one, please give us a call at our convenient San Diego, CA office!